The Ascension of `Abdu’l-Bahá

The Baha’ i belive that it is critical to the spiritual development of their members to be involved in the local community doing what ever they can to improve all lives.  They follow faithfully this quote by Abdu’l-Bahá.   “What are the requirements? Love for mankind, sincerity toward all, reflecting the oneness of the world of humanity, philanthropy, becoming enkindled with the fire of the love of God, attainment to the knowledge of God and that which is conducive to human welfare.”   http://www.bahai.org/action/response-call-bahaullah/   Copyright © Bahá'í International Community”   http://media.bahai.org/

The Baha’ i belive that it is critical to the spiritual development of their members to be involved in the local community doing what ever they can to improve all lives.  They follow faithfully this quote by Abdu’l-Bahá.   “What are the requirements? Love for mankind, sincerity toward all, reflecting the oneness of the world of humanity, philanthropy, becoming enkindled with the fire of the love of God, attainment to the knowledge of God and that which is conducive to human welfare.”

http://www.bahai.org/action/response-call-bahaullah/  Copyright © Bahá'í International Community”  http://media.bahai.org/

The Baha’i Faith is centered around three core concepts, often called the “three onenesses”.   These central teaching are the Oneness of God, the Oneness of Religion and the Oneness of Humanity. 

The Baha’ i believe that the truth has been revealed by God through a series of divinely sent Messengers over time.  These Messengers include Jesus Christ, Moses, Abraham, Mohammed, Zoroaster, Buddha, Krishna and others.  The teachings were tailored to meet the needs, times and locations of the people who received them.

The Baha’ i believe it is necessary to be involved in the world, and as such reach out to communities as their resources allow.  It is not a religion which sits at home or hides behind walls.

Their central book of faith is the Kitáb-i-Aqdas or Aqdas written by Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the religion, in 1873.  They believe in life after death accepting that the individual’s soul is created at the time of conception and it will still be independent in the eternal realm.

The Universal House of Justice, headquartered at Haifa, Israel, is the organizational head of the church and deals with issues not covered in Baha’u’llah’s Kitab-iAqdas.  The faith has neither priests nor clergy but focuses on local gathering held in their House of Worship (mašriqu-l-'aḏkār is an Arabic phrase meaning Dawning).

The community governance begins with the local spiritual assembly.  Local communities elect delegates to a national convention each year.  The national convention elects the members of the spiritual assembly which has jurisdiction over the faith.

“Copyright © Bahá'í International Community”  http://media.bahai.org/